About your Search

20121222
20121230
STATION
CNNW 4
CSPAN2 4
CSPAN 2
KPIX (CBS) 2
LINKTV 2
MSNBCW 1
LANGUAGE
English 18
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
american president had made in modern times on the whole question of civil rights and voting rights. he condemned the violence over and over again, and near the end of the speech he said, "and we shall overcome. we shall overcome." we call it the "we shall overcome" speech. i was sitting next to dr. martin luther king jr. as we listened to president johnson. i looked at dr. king. tears came down his face. he started crying. and we all cried a little when we heard the president saying, "we shall overcome." and dr. king said, "we will make it from selma to montgomery, and the voting rights act will be passed." two weeks later, more than 10,000 of us, people from all over america, started walking from selma to montgomery. and by the time we made it to montgomery five days later, there were almost 30,000 black and white citizens-protestant, catholic, jewish, men, women, young people. it was like a holy march. and the congress debated the act, passed it, and on august 6, 1965, president lyndon johnson signed it into law. amy goodman: congressmember john lewis. we continue our conversation af
by a leader of the civil rights movement who risked his life numerous times marching for the right of all americans to vote: 13-term democratic congressmember john lewis of georgia. he was a leader of the civil rights movement who marched side by side with dr. martin luther king. he served as chair of the student nonviolent coordinating committee, helped organize the freedom rides and spoke at the 1963 march on washington. he has been arrested more than 40 times and has just written a new book called across that vision for change. he visited us in our studio, and i asked congressmember lewis about the voter purge in florida, where the justice department had sued to block republican governor rick scott's controversial effort to remove thousands of registered voters from the rolls, using an outdated drivers' license database to ostensibly identify non-citizens registered to vote. rep. john lewis: it is unreal, it is unbelievable, that at this time in our history, 47 years after the voting rights act was passed and signed into law, that we're trying to go backward. i think there is a systema
records, 24 hours and 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember strom thurmond today as one of the last of the jim crow demagogues. and he was. he was that. he was one of the last jim crow demagogue. what we forget about thurmond is that he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. what do i mean by that? what's a sun belt conservative? the sun belt, it's one of the big stories, one of the major stories in the history of 20th century american politics. and that is the flow of jobs, of industry, of resources and population from the states of the northeast and the midwest to the south and the southwest in the post-world war ii period. the southern states were recruiting industries. they were passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. so states like mississippi, states like georgia and texas and florida and southern california, arizona, north carolina are all being transformed in the
him. not moving him around from point to point as we were advised by john door, my iconic civil rights hero and nicholas katzenbach. he was to have as much freedom as any other student. well, yes. but at the same time, there are deer hunters, and it was the season, and we had cop instant, we were constantly aware who might come up on to the campus, didn't look like a student, had a bent mind and a deer rifle, and we had to be constantly aware of that kind of threat to his life. he was a brave person. i was sitting in his dormitory room the first couple days reading the hate mail, the death threats. very accurate, very detailed. james, we know where you live, we know where your participants are -- parents are, we're going to kill you and we're going to kill your twins. he looked at me and said, lieu tempt, i'm late for my spanish class. let's go. that kind of courage stayed with him throughout my association with him. he never cracked, he never blinked. the students blinked. i should say that 99% of the student body went about their way getting an education. they cared little about him
was going on. >> you know, one thing that really struck me was his involvement in the civil rights. i look at the country today. there's so many people that don't know the history, have no clue about the history of civil rights. and here is your father speaking very passionately about a young black student who had been admitted to the university of mississippi. they were protesting on the grounds. they do not want james meredith there. and your father was talking to the governor about that. >> we've got to get order up there and that's what we thought we were going to have. >> mr. president, please, why don't you give an order to remove him. >> how can i remove him, governor, when there's a riot in the street and he may step out of that building and something happen to him? i can't remove him under those conditions. let's get order, then we can do something about meredith. we've got to get somebody up there now to get order and stop the firing and the shooting. then you and i will talk on the phone about meredith. first we've got to get order. >> he's really mad. i kno
. and, of course, their own country, lawyers have experience a lot of pain in the civil rights movement. so my question is, in line with the comment about practical steps, what would be a facing of the introduction of the rule of law that might be suggested to the chinese government and to chinese political and legal leaders as a way to avoid these calamitous events and bring about the rule of law? >> can you suggest to them that they pay the judges and say we will reducers our, we won't fire you? they might be willing to do that. and after they did that, you know, judges would love it, and nobody else would like it. but i mean, they would do, or maybe they would say we have an administrative law grow here. by the way, let's have all the corporate cities on television. the proceeding, i'm not saying the deliberations. why don't he they do that? let's not get into that. 5 let's have the trials and all those things. they do that. maybe they would, or maybe, what about this arbitration resolving business differences, would you be willing to take some the judges? after all, you're not payin
will run at 186 miles per hour. >>> and civil rights icon nelson mandela has been discharged from a south africa hospital. 94-year-old former president will continue treatment at his home. he was hospitalized with a lung infection on december 8th. one week later, he had surgery to remove gallstones. i'm sure everyone's pleased to hear that he's doing well. >> thanks so much for that, lisa. >>> in the wake of the connecticut school shooting, the nr after the wants to put armed volunteers in every american school. the proposal facing heavy criticism. the man in charge is here to defend it. plus how the host of nbc's "meet the press" may have broken washington, d.c. gun laws. it's lots of things. all waking up. ♪ becoming part of the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ trees will talk to networks will talk to scientists about climate change. cars will talk to road sensors will talk to stoplights about traffic efficiency. the ambulance will talk to patient records will talk to doctors about saving lives. it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkabl
. if you look at the civil rights movement, that started with emmitt till, montgomery, montgomery was supposed to be a boycott. people on the ground who begin to drive this issue. the conversation can't start in washington. washington is an aftereffect. it has to start with the people in various places driving them to move. if that doesn't happen, they will not move. >> you're absolutely right. that is the history of movements in america. but there is going to be a bill we know senator dianne feinstein is going to introduce a bill on the first day of the new congress. why shouldn't more folks get behind that, including some republicans? because i'd like to remind you of one thing. justice scalia said in the heller decision, like most rights the second amendment is not unlighted. he said, it is not a right to keep and carry any weapon whatsoever in any manner whatsoever for whatever purpose. from the high priest of the supreme court of conservatism himself. why doesn't that create some room for current conservatives like ronald reagan did in 1994 to back an assault weapons ban? >>
contributor and civil rights and law professor avery friedman. morning, avery. >> good morning, carol. >> i think the thing that stands out for most people is that this man was convicted of murder for killing his grandmother who was 92 years old. apparently he beat her to death and he was on parole. he only served 17 years. how is that possible? >> yeah, it seems impossible to happen. but if you study this, spengler was in his late 20s when he committed this murder. and one would expect that he would have spent the rest of his life in the new york penal system. the fact is, though, that he was paroled out and actually had an obligation to report to his parole officer until this happened. but the fact is that it struck me as virtually impossible for the parole department not to know that this guy was a problem. the fact that he committed this murder -- again, even though he was in his 20s, unless he was a model person in the penitentiary, it would seem pretty obvious that there was a problem with this guy and of course the worst happened here. and we will never know, although we do tend to t
of the civil rights movement and the life or death decisions being made during the cuban missile crisis. >> caroline kennedy joins "listening in" editor on the discussion on the 1962 recordings of the late president from office. tuesday evening at 7:00 in eastern on c-span2. >> "washington journal" continues. host: we want to welcome back to our table, bill bennett. let's just continue the conversation we were having with our viewers. does religion and flow of your politics? guest: sure, i think it influences a lot of people's politics. daniel patrick moynihan, a democrat senator from new york, one of the great men of the senate -- george will things he was the model of will a senator should be -- taught us all that culture is more important than politics and terms of moving a society. political leaders in politics can alter the culture. we can see that effect, too. but culture really affects politics more than a big part of the culture is religion, what people believe. the best example i can think of would be martin luther king, jr.. he was a minister of the christian faith. he had a p
in the south. one of the things that happened after the civil rights movement is we saw more and more of the institutions that were about political education, that were not just about pipelining black, particularly blooek leaders who were going to look at and develop an understand the policies that were necessary for the black community. in order for it to thrive. we have actually seen a demobilization of that infrastructure. so when we have this conversation like 30% of blaeks voting for strom thurmond, one of the things we have to think about is, we're responding to, this is the guy that made the phone call or wrote the letter that helped me out. it's a different kind of political education and engagement than saying -- what actually fixes some of the things that we need fixed in our community? how are we assessing our political leadership on that basis? that's something that's actually extremely important and we've been seeing less and less of it in many black communities. >> i want to agree with my friend, mayor reed. the republican party is a learning party and it knows it has to
leaders say the constitution takes away many of their rights. in syria's civil war, rebel forces appear to be gaining ground against the assad regime. sctivists say the rebels captured the town of harem along the turkish border after a cttle that lasted four weeks. the rebels had already captured other towns in the area and at least three military bases. thpe benedict spoke up today for the 40,000 killed in syria in inarly two years of fighting. ,n his christmas address, he denounced the slaughter of the defenseless. inialso urged palestinians and israelis to find the courage to negotiate. the housing industry is coming back, and guess who is on a buying spree? and this could be a huge advance in space flight. spreusable rocket. when the cbs evening news continues. continues. if you have high blood pressure and get a cold get coricidin hbp. the number one pharmacist recommended cold brand designed for people with high blood pressure. and the only one i use to relieve my cold symptoms without raising my blood pressure. coricidin hbp. anyone have occasional constipation, diarrhea, gas, bl
. craig rights in the civil war at sea the naval forces did not determine the outcome of the civil war to the north would have won the war might even without the naval supremacy. but the naval forces affected its trajectory and very likely its length and that in the end was important enough. jim goes a little bit further, and i quote, to say the union army won the civil war would still the case much too strongly but it is accurate to say that couldn't have been without the contribution of the navy. we will let you fight it out on some future arena. but i will end officially by pointing something not be heard about this problem that they had with each other and these gentlemen are such good colleagues to me and each other jim mcpherson calls him the civil war at sea in his official appraisal and an outstanding study of the union and confederate navy and he calls his war on the water in importance story written with an eloquent him. so we have a quandary in the tough economic times. [laughter] a choice to be made. how to do it i found the perfect which to ask. the editor of the magazine
quantities at all. patti ann: well, right. and as you mentioned, this is a civil war. >> yeah. patti ann: if assad exits, it's far from over. there are various possible outcomes here. do you see the rebels, though, being able to forge some kind of a government that can work with itself? >> it's possible, but within the rebel factions there are over 4,000 foreign fighters. their loyalty is to jihad. they're there as jihadists just as they were to al-qaeda in iraq. when they were killing americans. so they're not, their interest is not in the future of syria. their interest is in the future of an islamist state. so that's why if anybody gets in there, the deal has to be -- and assad needs to make this deal with someone who he thinks can honor it -- we need to lock down those weapons first and have a presence of we'll call it an adult country rather than the civil war participantsdividing the spoils of that very lucrative arms cache. patti ann: yeah. what is the likelihood that a non-islamist state, a more democratic type of government will emerge from all of this? >> well, that's very diff
sectarian civil war. we're talking a time frame of years. right now, jon, the death toll is about 45,000. a lot of people are saying that number could easily double in the coming months and years as this violence continues, jon. jon: the refugees keep streaming out of that war-torn country. leland vittert in jerusalem for us. leland, thank you. harris: new information from russia today where president vladmir putin has signed that bill banning americans from adopting russian children. we saw this coming and now it has happened. the bill angering americans and russians who say it victimizes the children just to make a political point. amy kellogg is live for us in london with more. amy, why have they passed this law? >> reporter: well, harris, the law is named after dima yakovlev, a toddler who died in the custody of his adoptive american parents a few years ago in the washington, d.c. area. he was left in a car in the heat but basically, it does appear that this law was actually a reaction to a law passed in the united states. it puts travel bans, visa bans and asset freezes on 60 ru
in the nearly two-year long civil war that activists say killed more than 40,000 people but it has not stopped the syrian government from attacking its own men, women, and children. a human rights group reports the regime shelled a bakery and killed 20 people, including at least eight children. we cannot independently confirm that. we're joined by a journalist who specializes on middle east affairs. this is a significant defection, lisa, and it appears from the you don't see that you have bashar al-assad losing his grip on power. >> absolutely. this is one of the most significant diminishing of power for the bashar al-assad regime. we've seen the military be a full supporter of asaid. a few defections but nothing of that caliber that would keep him there. there's a few factors that since march of 2011 when uprisings began in syria that helped assad stayed in power. little by little we see these factors dissolve, one the military and this large defection we had today. the other being support from russia. the two other elements that still remain in place, however, keeping him there, are thal awa
, and offend every standard of civilized society by bringing an even more toxic max of reckless behavior and criminal cruelty right into our homes every minute, every day, every hour, of every single year. a child growing up in america today witnesses 16,000 murders and 200,000 acts of violence by the time he or she reaches the ripe old age of 18. throughout it all, to many in the national media, their corporate owners, and their stockholders, act as silent enablers if not complice it co- conspirators. rather than face their own moral failings, the media demonize to gun owners. >> reckless behavior becoming from the nra. the nra has blood on its ads. -- ahands. the nra has blood on its hands. shame on the nra ban assault weapons now. ban on assault weapons now. stop killing our children. stop the reckless behavior of the nra. we need gun control now. >> rather than face their own moral failings, the media demonizes the gun owners, amplifies their cries for more laws, and fills the national media with misinformation and dishonest thinking that only delay meaningful action in all that guar
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)